‘A movie about flowers?’ Notes on the ecological turn in adaptation studies (2024)

Article Navigation

Volume 17 Issue 2 August 2024
  • < Previous
  • Next >

Journal Article

Get access

Tomas Elliott

Department of English, Northeastern University London

,

London

,

United Kingdom

Corresponding author: Email: tomas.elliott@nulondon.ac.uk

Search for other works by this author on:

Oxford Academic

Adaptation, Volume 17, Issue 2, August 2024, Pages 320–337, https://doi.org/10.1093/adaptation/apae015

Published:

26 June 2024

Search

Close

Search

Advanced Search

Search Menu

Abstract

This article takes up and responds to the recent ecological turn in adaptation studies, exploring the discipline’s widespread interest in the overlap between the notion of adaptation in evolutionary biology and the notion of adaptation in literature, film, and media studies. It argues that in order to develop a historically and ecocritically alert approach to adaptation studies, it is necessary to unpack what is at stake in using biological terms and paradigms to study adaptation in art. Firstly, it offers a survey of several studies that have explored the overlap between adaptation in nature and adaptation in culture, arguing that these have been overly influenced by the notions of neo-Darwinism that were popularized by Richard Dawkins in The Selfish Gene (1976). Secondly, it offers a rereading of the film that has become a primary case study among theorists who have reached for biological metaphors to explain cultural change: Adaptation (2002). It argues that whereas scholars have often tended to use Adaptation as a springboard from which to launch an exploration of the purported hom*ology between adaptation in nature and adaptation in art, in fact, the film’s evolutionary themes are clearly historicizable, tied to a set of values coordinated around ideas of heteronormative reproductivity, dissemination, and growth. Examining those values helps to demonstrate how the film’s evolutionary themes are deployed as part of its representational strategies, thereby challenging the idea that they might be unproblematically used to describe the overlap between adaptation in biology and adaptation in art.

adaptation, evolution, Darwin, Charlie Kaufman, ecocriticism, biology

© The Author(s) 2024. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For commercial re-use, please contact reprints@oup.com for reprints and translation rights for reprints. All other permissions can be obtained through our RightsLink service via the Permissions link on the article page on our site—for further information please contact journals.permissions@oup.com.

This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/pages/standard-publication-reuse-rights)

Issue Section:

Original Articles

You do not currently have access to this article.

Download all slides

Sign in

Get help with access

Personal account

  • Sign in with email/username & password
  • Get email alerts
  • Save searches
  • Purchase content
  • Activate your purchase/trial code
  • Add your ORCID iD

Sign in Register

Institutional access

    Sign in through your institution

    Sign in through your institution

  1. Sign in with a library card
  2. Sign in with username/password
  3. Recommend to your librarian

Institutional account management

Sign in as administrator

Get help with access

Institutional access

Access to content on Oxford Academic is often provided through institutional subscriptions and purchases. If you are a member of an institution with an active account, you may be able to access content in one of the following ways:

IP based access

Typically, access is provided across an institutional network to a range of IP addresses. This authentication occurs automatically, and it is not possible to sign out of an IP authenticated account.

Sign in through your institution

Choose this option to get remote access when outside your institution. Shibboleth/Open Athens technology is used to provide single sign-on between your institution’s website and Oxford Academic.

  1. Click Sign in through your institution.
  2. Select your institution from the list provided, which will take you to your institution's website to sign in.
  3. When on the institution site, please use the credentials provided by your institution. Do not use an Oxford Academic personal account.
  4. Following successful sign in, you will be returned to Oxford Academic.

If your institution is not listed or you cannot sign in to your institution’s website, please contact your librarian or administrator.

Sign in with a library card

Enter your library card number to sign in. If you cannot sign in, please contact your librarian.

Society Members

Society member access to a journal is achieved in one of the following ways:

Sign in through society site

Many societies offer single sign-on between the society website and Oxford Academic. If you see ‘Sign in through society site’ in the sign in pane within a journal:

  1. Click Sign in through society site.
  2. When on the society site, please use the credentials provided by that society. Do not use an Oxford Academic personal account.
  3. Following successful sign in, you will be returned to Oxford Academic.

If you do not have a society account or have forgotten your username or password, please contact your society.

Sign in using a personal account

Some societies use Oxford Academic personal accounts to provide access to their members. See below.

Personal account

A personal account can be used to get email alerts, save searches, purchase content, and activate subscriptions.

Some societies use Oxford Academic personal accounts to provide access to their members.

Viewing your signed in accounts

Click the account icon in the top right to:

  • View your signed in personal account and access account management features.
  • View the institutional accounts that are providing access.

Signed in but can't access content

Oxford Academic is home to a wide variety of products. The institutional subscription may not cover the content that you are trying to access. If you believe you should have access to that content, please contact your librarian.

Institutional account management

For librarians and administrators, your personal account also provides access to institutional account management. Here you will find options to view and activate subscriptions, manage institutional settings and access options, access usage statistics, and more.

Purchase

Subscription prices and ordering for this journal

Purchasing options for books and journals across Oxford Academic

Short-term Access

To purchase short-term access, please sign in to your personal account above.

Don't already have a personal account? Register

‘A movie about flowers?’ Notes on the ecological turn in adaptation studies - 24 Hours access

EUR €38.00

GBP £33.00

USD $41.00

Rental

‘A movie about flowers?’ Notes on the ecological turn in adaptation studies (4)

This article is also available for rental through DeepDyve.

Advertisem*nt

Citations

Views

Altmetric

More metrics information

Metrics

Total Views 0

0 Pageviews

0 PDF Downloads

Since 7/9/2024

Citations

Powered by Dimensions

Altmetrics

×

Email alerts

Article activity alert

Advance article alerts

New issue alert

Receive exclusive offers and updates from Oxford Academic

Citing articles via

Google Scholar

  • Latest

  • Most Read

  • Most Cited

‘A movie about flowers?’ Notes on the ecological turn in adaptation studies
Wong Kar-wai’s Argentine Affair: Happy Together as a Translingual and Multimodal Adaptation
Adaptations of masculinity: mapping the affective power of Achilles and Patroclus
Horses, gender, and (queer) masculine desire, or how experimental found footage film recycles three Hollywood films
The ‘full-flowing stomach’: unwholesome food, climate, and colonialism in King Lear and Kristian Levring’s The King is Alive

More from Oxford Academic

Arts and Humanities

Books

Journals

Advertisem*nt

‘A movie about flowers?’ Notes on the ecological turn in adaptation studies (2024)

References

Top Articles
Latest Posts
Article information

Author: Zonia Mosciski DO

Last Updated:

Views: 5741

Rating: 4 / 5 (51 voted)

Reviews: 82% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Zonia Mosciski DO

Birthday: 1996-05-16

Address: Suite 228 919 Deana Ford, Lake Meridithberg, NE 60017-4257

Phone: +2613987384138

Job: Chief Retail Officer

Hobby: Tai chi, Dowsing, Poi, Letterboxing, Watching movies, Video gaming, Singing

Introduction: My name is Zonia Mosciski DO, I am a enchanting, joyous, lovely, successful, hilarious, tender, outstanding person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.